May 152017
 

Secretary CubicleBy Sharon Morton, MSG Secretary

 

Spring has arrived on the farm and in our Grange lives.  New growth is everywhere from the budding trees to the planted seedlings.

The following Continuous Membership Certificates have been issued and will have been or are already presented to our members.  Androscoggin Grange #8:  Janice Brewer for 25 years; Joanne Boyington for 25 years; Carol Buzzell for 25 years and Merton Buzzell for 25 years; Danville Junction Grange #65:  Beverly Lashua for 75 years; Mildred Brainerd for 70 years; Glenys Ryder for 65 years; Neil Peaco for 60 years; Gleason Sturtevant for 55 years; and Ken Brewer for 40 years; Norway Grange #45:  Timothy Pike for 55 years; Willow Grange #366:  Hazel Kleinschmidt for 70 years; Farmington Grange #12:  Robert Smith for 50 years; Stephen Scharoun for 25 years; Marion Scharoun for 25 years; L. Herbert York for 65 years and Andrew Milliken for 55 years; Pioneer Grange 219:  Joel Morse for 60 years; Margaret Morse for 60 years and Bruce Stimpson for 55 years and Jacksonville Grange #358: Nathan Pennell for 25 years.

If you are printing your Continuous Membership Certificate Application from the website you will note the change that National Grange is now charging shipping and handling using the chart below:

*Please use the following Shipping & Handling Chart

  • Orders: Up to $10.00 = $4.00
  • Orders: $10.0l – $19.99 = $5.00
  • Orders: $20.00 – $49.99 = $7.00
  • Orders: $50.00 – $74.99 = $9.00
  • Orders: $75.00 – $99.99 = $10.00
  • Orders: $100.00 – $124.99 = $12.00
  • Orders: $125.00 – $249.99 = $15.00
  • Orders: $250 and above = $20.00

Example:             Three Golden Sheaf Certificates at $10.00 each  =  $30.00
One 75 Year Diamond Certificate & Folder at $10.00 =   $10.00
Sub Total: $40.00

You will then use the chart and find the correct shipping and handling for your $40.00 order which is $7.00.  You would then make your check payable to National Grange in the amount of $47.00 and mail your application form to me for processing.  If you have the old form please feel free to use them but use the shipping and handling chart above to correctly pay for your certificates being issued from the National Grange.  If you would like your certificate by a certain date please note that on the application form. I will advise National of your request.

Recording the minutes of your Grange is one of your most important duties.  They should be exact, concise, detailed, yet comprehensive history of your records maintained in a permanent record book.

A membership record book of all members should be kept with the complete address, degree affiliations, dates, dues records and any other necessary information which should be kept available and up to date.

Grange Secretaries are constantly required to fill out all kinds of forms.  It is imperative that all directions on each form be read and carefully understood before proceeding.    Be sure all questions are properly answered in full, that names, addresses, including Zip Codes are correct and complete and all information legible.

“Let us not forget the precepts of our Order. Let us add dignity to labor and in our dealings with our fellow men, be honest, be just and fear not… The record of your Grange will be held as a memento of your labors long after the recording hand has crumbled into dust.  Let them be exact that they may redound to your honor an exhibit a faithful history of the work of your Grange to all who come after us.”

Until next month!

May 142017
 

by Rick Grotton, State Master

Hoping that all mothers had a very happy Mother’s Day. Even if the weather wasn’t cooperating, the day should always be a special one.  We should not let outside distractions influence our enthusiasm and positive thoughts. The more we dwell on negative thoughts, the more negativity comes to us. The more positive thoughts we have, the more successful we are in our labors and accomplishments.  If we dwell on negativity then we are using our energies on things that are petty and have no relevance to our Grange work. Thus we accomplish little. Other–members and the public–pick up on such energies. This IS a difference whether you get a new member and why some Granges fold. Who wants to belong to an organization with crabby and disrespectful people? Let the little things go, especially when dealing with our brothers and sisters.  Too many times I have attended meetings where after the meeting, someone will come to me and accuse another of insubordination or tattle on some petty thing that often makes no sense. Most often it is not even true. I have seen others leave a meeting (just recently) during a closing in which one of those who left had a speaking part. They just walked out.  Imagine what the visitors who were non-members were thinking. This is the highest form of disrespect to our Order! Just because we don’t get our way doesn’t mean we have the right to “sabotage” a meeting trying to make a point by leaving during a respective time of a meeting. This is disrespectful to not just the Order but to its members, especially when there are prospective members in attendance. Brothers and Sisters, these are big “don’ts” that harm your Grange and its reputations. The point is, that we all need to get along for the GOTO; things will get done, new members will join and the public will attend our events. Which brings us further onto the topic of membership.

Since the State Membership Committee no longer exists as of May 1, there have been thoughts on the approach to realign the committee into teams in different areas of the State. After attending meetings which have turned into town hall discussions some thoughts come to mind. One thought is to have at least five teams consisting of no more than five (5) members each travel within their respective areas to educate members about membership drives (including recruiting new Pomona members), hold discussions, do training and to encourage and attend any open houses for the public. Anyone interested in forming or being a part of a team let me know so I can hold some training classes for those interested. This is not  “we have always done it that way” but a different approach.

I encourage more Granges to invite other Granges for town hall discussions. Include prospective members and reach out to the public to attend. Invite a State Officer or arrange the meeting when your Deputy is present. It would certainly be a pleasure for me to attend one of these discussions where everyone has a chance to ask questions and gain valuable information. More information how to set up or how to arrange such a meeting can be obtained by contacting me.  Membership should always be a top priority whether your Grange is flourishing or not. Think about the Good of the Order. Think about improvements and what your Grange could be doing. Share ideas, ask questions, make suggestions, develop goals and be successful in your endeavors.

Election time is near which is a very important period in our Grange.  I would encourage members to try different offices as there will be fresh ideas and new leadership. It does not help you to have say the same Master serve for an extended period of time. History proves that having the same leaders year after year does not work for any organization. Fresh ideas and new leadership provide new goals and approaches to reach those goals. Even if you have a small Grange, officer changes are encouraged. The position of Master is NOT one of power but of keeping your Grange running smoothly and effectively. The Master does not run the Grange as a “dictator” or make all decisions for the Grange. The Master does not control any member or other offices. Should this be happening in your Grange, then it is time for a new leader. Consider what is Good for the Order. Do not worry about hurt feelings, do not be afraid of making the change or putting them back in the same office just because you don’t want to be looked upon as a “rebel.” Believe it or not, there are Granges which operate in this manner and many people will not join or members go to meetings or the person becomes upset when replaced. Many of these Granges struggle and end up closing, wondering why they can’t get new members. In the true sense of Grange, if someone (in any office) gets replaced, there should be no hard feelings or resentment toward the Grange or its members. If they threaten to quit because they don’t want to give up an office or when replaced, let them go; they are not true Grangers or have the best interest of the Grange in mind. Your Grange will be better off. History has also proven this to be true. Each officer has their own duties but in an office such as Lecturer, the Master should know what is being planned for the year out of common courtesy in order to have the Grange run smoothly. The Master position is not to be feared but experienced and much can be learned. I have found this to be a true statement having been Master in all levels of the State.

Although some of this discussion has to do with negativity, it is in no way meant to be disparaging or condescending. It is meant to be a wake-up call for all and try to “clean up” within and have our organization primed to accept and RETAIN new members. With these negative circumstances happening in our Granges, it is holding us back as an organization. It is what I have been experiencing in my travels and needs to be communicated to all so we know what NOT to do and for GOTO.

 

May 112017
 

by Vicki Huff

The Maine State Grange needs your help at the Big E. Maine is responsible for filling 18 work shifts in the New England Grange Building at this year’s fair. The dates Maine is responsible for are the first three days of the fair: September 15, 16, and 17. There are two shifts each day with three people required for each shift. The morning shift is 9:00 – 3:00 and the evening shift is 3:00 – 9:00. Two people are needed to work at check-out, one to run the cash register and one to bag the items. The third person will be at the quilt raffle table (here you are mostly sitting) asking shoppers if they would like to make a donation and receive a chance on the quilt. This year’s quilt is being made by Vermont and the funds raised will be donated to Dodge House in Rutland. Dodge House is a place that Veterans can go and get any kind of help they may need. That could be a meal, a place to stay, help filling out paperwork and help

This year’s quilt is being made by Vermont and the funds raised will be donated to Dodge House in Rutland. Dodge House is a place that Veterans can go and get any kind of help they may need. That could be a meal, a place to stay, help filling out paperwork and help getting assistance. They are there for the Veterans.

If you are interested in volunteering to work in the New England Grange Building please contact me at Granger1atmainedotrrdotcom  (Granger1atmainedotrrdotcom)   or 207-699-2830, I am coordinating the volunteers for Maine. Deadline is June 30, 2017, as information needs to be forwarded to the Store Managers. Please make your plans now and let me know A.S.A.P.

We also need volunteers to walk in the parade on Grange Day, Sunday, September 24, 2017, at 5:00 p.m. every day. If you are interested in walking in the parade please contact me and I will explain the process for getting reimbursed the ticket fee for that day only.

Those making items to be sold in the store please contact State Grange Headquarters for collection options.

All help is greatly appreciated!

Apr 272017
 

With thanks to State Secretary Sharon Morton, we’ve recently added two documents to the “Program Books and Information” Page:

  1. The Journal of Proceedings – 2016 Convention is a summary (93 pages) of last year’s convention, including committee reports, budget information, etc.
  2. The Membership Recognition Order Form which has been updated to reflect the recent price increases announced by National Grange.

The Maine State Grange website is your “goto” place for information!

Apr 202017
 

We’ve made some minor updates and changes to the ODD Directory (Officers, Directors, and Deputies) and uploaded it to the website! Please download and print some copies for yourself and your members: ODD-Directory-04-17.

Also, note that we’ve added a new section to the “Program Books and Information Page” for the soon to be officially announced Agricultural Education Committee. There are already a few resources listed under this heading!

Happy Grange Month! If your Grange did something special, send us a report for featuring on the website! Photos are great–just attach them to an email to the webmaster. (Smaller file sizes are really helpful. If you are using a photo program that allows you reduce resolution and file size, please consider doing so before sending!)

Communication Consideration:

Talking and eloquence are not the same: to speak and to speak well are two things. A fool may talk, but a wise man speaks.

Heinrich Heine

Apr 142017
 

Secretary CubicleBy Sharon Morton, MSG Secretary

April is a busy month here at State Headquarters as well as in our Subordinate Granges. My time has been busy with the finishing of the 2016 Journal of Proceedings, which will be published on the website. April is a month to celebrate our grange heritage and what a great way to do so is to have an open house, invite all to enjoy a great meal and program.

I have had the opportunity to issue these Continuous Membership Certificates which have been or will be presented to our members.  Somerset Grange #18, Gwendolyn Knight for 65 years; Farrilyn Chase for 70 years; Bernice Chase for 55 years; Norman Chase for 55 years; Elizabeth Wilder for 25 years; Alice Jones for 70 years; and Marjorie Farrand for 50 years; Manchester Grange #172, Mark L. Johnston 50 years; Brenda L. Lake for 50 years; and Edward Lincoln III for 50 years; Mousam Lake Grange #467, Sylvia Young for 70 years and Clayton Chute for 65 years; Bingham Grange #237, Terry Spencer for 40 years; Bear Mt. Grange #62, Linda Davis for 50 years; Clara Hamlin for 60 years; Prentiss Kimball for 60 years; and Glenn Chute for 60 years; Huntoon Hill #398, Sharon Leeman for 55 and 60 years; Fairview Grange #342, Marilyn Giroux for 75 years; Ellie Zarcone for 40 years and George Merry for 75 years; Hollis Grange #132, Valerie Joy for 50 years; Maple Grove Grange #148, Carol R. Brown for 50 years and Esther L. Kilborn for 80 years; Topsham Grange #37, Julia Wallace for 50 years and Merton Ricker for 70 years; Valley Grange #144, Elizabeth Herring for 70 years; Roderick Lander for 50 years and Harriet Mitchell for 70 years and White Rock Grange #380, Gloria McBee for 55 years.

Quarterly Reports:  Please remember the quarterly reports are due March 31st; June 30th; September 30th and December 31st and are due at headquarters postmarked on or before the 10th of the month following each quarter.

KEEPING MINUTES – As Secretary, your first priority is keeping a record of the meetings of your Grange.  Accuracy should be the goal, for your minutes are your Grange’s permanent record.  Remember that “Robert’s Rules of Order” advises, “They (the minutes) should contain mainly a record of what was done at a meeting, not what was said by the members unless in the form of a motion… Minutes should never reflect the Secretary’s opinion on anything said or done.”

Resolutions and motions should be included in the minutes word for word, as well as the action taken on them.  Detailed accounts of receipts and expenses should be included.  Communications read need not be included word for word, only that they were read and their general subject.  You can refer members to the communication if they wish details.

An exception might be the description of the lecturer’s programs.  If a member says something particularly worthy, or a discussion is important, including it in the minutes should be approved by the Grange.

Next time I will touch on the Secretary’s responsibility on maintaining records.

I will be updating the Roster Information Form that will be sent with your June Quarterly Report. This form will include the name and number of your Grange; physical location of your Grange Hall; contact name and phone number; name, address, phone number, and email address of your elected Master, Lecturer, Secretary and CWA Chairman.

Please contact me immediately with any address changes or any changes to the officers listed above so that our records will be correct and updated.

Happy Spring, and enjoy the nice weather.

Apr 132017
 

by Rick Grotton, State Master

I want to thank all of you that helped in any way to make the visit from our National Master, Betsy Huber, an enjoyable one. It was a pleasure to have her come to Maine to visit. She arrived on April 5 to attend our Legislative Luncheon and that evening we went to Androscoggin Pomona where we had some good laughs and enjoyed a program on Laughter: How it Affects your Health.

Thursday, she visited the State Capitol and was able to see the House and Senate in action with a trip to the Maine State Museum following. We had a wet trip to Piscataquis Pomona that evening where a town hall was held for the program. There were some great questions asked and some great discussions. Participants from area Pomonas and Granges attended.

Friday was a laid back day, however, during the evening, beginning at 5 pm we had a potluck dinner with Betsy addressing us on what is happening at National and by answering pertinent questions by the attendees. Independent media coverage was present for the evening, taping the session and interviewing Betsy. Saturday was the Junior Contests and the obligation ceremony performed on two new Junior members. Thank you, Christine. her Committee, and Sherry for their work.

In the afternoon, three teams participated in the Assistant’s Contest.  Christopher Heath, New Hampshire State Master attended as a judge. Sister Betsy and I served as judges. Thank you, Brother Chris! The winners were Jim Meserve and Laurie McBurnie. Henry and Sharon Morton and Adrian Griffin and Marilyn Stinson were the other participants. That evening we enjoyed a fun visit to Lincoln Pomona witha program on Maine Trivia. She enjoyed visiting with Maine Grangers and I thank all who came out during the week to meet her.  She left early Sunday morning to head back to Pennsylvania.

One thing I do want to share concerns ritual. Since we are no longer considered a “secret society,” it is customary to allow non-members (prospective members) to sit in our Grange meetings and the strictness used in the past concerning ritual has been lessened. The opening and closing ceremonies are to be used, however, in the newer manuals, the alternative ceremonies that are included can be used. It is an option for any Grange to take up the password. This is a big change for us as New England is the only region that strictly adheres to the ritual. If there are any questions, please let me know.

I think we should be organizing some more town hall discussions in various areas. If your area would like one, please let me know and also your Pomona. These discussions will help all to understand in what direction the Grange is heading, will provide you with answers and information vital to all areas of Grange.

There have been some people interested in leadership positions and I will refer them to the appropriate committees. It is exciting to learn how Grange is understood in different areas of our state. Many dwell more on the agricultural side where others are more into the community service side, however, it appears that all areas are being covered no matter which aspect is favored in any area. The trend seems to be that there are younger farmers appearing and a need to learn how to be self-sufficient on growing food whether you live in an urban or rural area. Thus, many Granges are developing programs based on this trend and are encouraged to do so. Ask those where milk and bread come from. Some will answer ‘from a store.” The Grange has ample opportunities to spread this information to communities and also to create resolutions to favor the small farms. An Agricultural Education Committee is being formed for this purpose and to create programs for agricultural education. I will keep all updated on its progress. In the meantime, keep providing resolutions on agricultural needs. I urge all Grangers to put their thoughts on paper, vote on the resolutions at your Subordinate Granges and filter them through your Pomona. GOTO your deputies, your directors and committee members for help if needed. There are many resources on the Internet how to write resolutions and there have been some resolution writing days at some Granges. Keep up on agricultural issues and trends in your newspapers and from television. Anyone can have their thoughts converted to a resolution. Let’s have some good, agricultural resolutions submitted for discussion at State Session in October.

Grange month activities are in full swing throughout the State. There are many community service nights, birthday celebrations and degree days being held. Check the website calendar for various activities in your areas.

I am sure most have heard the National Grange talk about doers? Are you a doer? What happens when the doers are gone? As our members get older, the ones we depend upon to get things done are becoming fewer and fewer. What happens from there?  We need doers, we need active membership, we need new leaders. Who are the doers in your Grange?

Webmaster’s note: There are resolution writing resources available on the Program Books and Information Page.

Mar 152017
 

by Rick Grotton, State Master

Grange month is upon us so let’s open those halls, invite the community and honor some recipients. Any Grange should be able to host some kind of community event during this month. Ideas include bring a community member with you to a meeting, have a program or speaker on agricultural education for the community, open houses, community citizen awards, or any other community oriented event. This is our 150th birthday so throw a party!

I attended the Master’s Conference last month and have come back with some ideas we can try. Let’s work on them together for the GOTO.

One idea was on the topic of mentoring. There are many of us that have a passion for Grange, visit others regularly and enjoy filling in where needed. We need some of these people to become mentors to help Granges. The duties of the mentor would be to give ideas, provide support, answer questions, help keep them organized and educate members about Grange traditions and rituals. The Mentor does not interfere in the business of that Grange or take charge of the meetings. They will offer suggestions when asked. The Mentor should meet with the Master at the first visit in order to become familiar with the operations of that Grange.This will not interfere with the duties of the Deputies. The Deputy has precedence over the Mentor when present at a meeting. There were a few of us that did mentoring a couple of years ago to help Grangers who took in a slew of new members, ones that were struggling or needed someone help to guide them in the right direction. I would like to plan a Mentoring workshop in the future for those interested.

Another thought is to form an Agricultural Education Committee separate from the Agriculture Committee designed to educate our communities, our young people and support our farmers. The Committee would include a member(s) from the Agricultural Committee Ag in the Classroom and maybe representatives from the FFA and 4H and other agricultural organizations. The purpose would be for the organizations to work together for a common cause; to promote and design educational agricultural programs.

Massachusetts has a program through the UMass System that has a hands on living classroom and a summer scholars program where students are given stipends for their work.

There is increasing interest in our communities to grow their own food but many need direction. This is where the Grange steps in. Holding agricultural programs on canning, sowing, how to maintain your gardens for successful harvests, soil, seeds and various other topics. People of all ages benefit from these programs. Invite the public and maybe have hands on projects or even start a community garden. Ask someone where their milk or bread comes from; more than one will answer “from a store.” Let’s take the lead as Grangers!! We are Doers.

By now many may think I’m daydreaming or other but why not try?

Mar 012017
 

It’s finally here… an updated directory of Granges in Maine, based on the 2017 Roster! We’ve sorted the list of Granges so you can sort by Grange name, Town Name, or Zip Code. You’ll find it on the Program Books and Information Page or you can open the file 2017 Directory of Granges directly for downloading and printing.

Speaking of finding a Grange, one observation I would make as a result of working with this data: Many Granges do not have an actual 911 compliant street address. By my estimation, over 40% of the listings could be considered non-compliant or incomplete from this perspective. This raises several important concerns.

More than ever, people are using GPS systems to locate places. (A long term project for the website may one day include adding a locator option with mapping options.) When we invite people to our Grange, we should be making it easy to find. (I could tell an embarrassing story on myself back in my early Grange member days. I actually drove to Lincoln Maine looking for a Lincoln Pomona Meeting!)

Perhaps even more important than visits, this is a potential safety concern. There are documented instances of emergency services not arriving in a timely fashion due to the lack of an adequate EMS address. If you have an emergency at your Grange Hall, calling 911 and saying “We’re next door to where the school house used to be…” is not likely going to be very effective. Many times the 911 dispatcher is located miles away and unfamiliar with the area where the emergency is taking place. Cell phones will often report the location automatically, but it just makes sense to take this precaution.

Usually all that’s required to get a street address is a visit to the town/municipal office.  Once you have it, another important step would be to display the street number prominently on the building or a post where it is visible from the street.